Ultimate Travel Gear Guide

Travel Gear

My Travel Gear: Everything I Own!

Many of you have been asking about my travel gear. So I’ve put together this page to share my long-term travel packing list. Obviously you want to use high-quality, lightweight & durable stuff.

The gear I use may not work for everyone. I carry extra electronic equipment to maintain this travel blog, and some camping equipment for the nights I choose to spend trekking up mountains, hitchhiking long distance, or exploring rainforests on my own.

All travelers have different tastes & requirements while on the road. The following gear list is just what I’ve found works best for my particular travel style.

While I often travel on an extreme budget, my gear can be expensive. I want it to be functional, multi-purpose, comfortable, and very tough. I don’t want to keep replacing worn-out equipment every few months — plus I have a slight obsession with keeping travel gear as lightweight as possible!

There are certainly lower-cost alternatives to some of these things.

Below you’ll find the travel gear that I currently use and love. Total weight of everything is 18 kg (40 lbs).

Travel Gear

Backpack 38L Backpack
Day Pack 22L Day Pack
Lightweight Jacket Weatherproof Jacket
Light Hiking Shoes Hiking Shoes
Luna Sandals Luna Sandals
Sleeping Bag Sleeping Bag
Camping Hammock Camping Hammock
Headlamp Headlamp
Toiletries Toiletries
Sunglasses Sunglasses
Water Bottle Filter Filtered Water Bottle
Luggage Lock Luggage Lock
Shemagh Shemagh Scarf
Leatherman Multitool Small Multi-Tool
Earplugs Earplugs
Aloksak Bags Aloksak Waterproof Bags
Pack It Sac Pack-It Sacs (4)
Compression Bag Compression Bag

Travel Clothing

You don’t need a huge wardrobe to travel. This is all the clothing I pack when traveling around the world.
You might also enjoy this post: What To Do About Laundry While Traveling?

Sweater Sweater/Sweatshirt (1 or 2)
Travel Pants Travel Pants (1)
Jeans Jeans (1)
Travel Shorts Hiking Shorts (1)
Boardshorts Boardshorts (1)
Collared Shirt Collared Shirts (2)
T Shirts T-Shirts (4)
Underwear Underwear (4)
Hiking Socks Socks (4)
Bandana Bandanas (2)

Electronic Gear

I would not be able to produce a travel blog of this caliber without some computer equipment. Other electronics are not absolutely needed, but they improve my quality of life on the road enough to be worth the weight.

Macbook Laptop 13″ Macbook Pro
Magic Mouse Magic Mouse
Hard Drive 3TB Hard Drive (2)
iPhone Unlocked iPhone 6
Power Strip Power Strip
Bluetooth Speaker Bluetooth Speaker
Kindle Kindle Paperwhite
WiFi Antenna WiFi Antenna
LifeProof Case LifeProof Case

Travel Photography Gear

For the photographers out there, this is the camera equipment I use for my travel photography.

Sony A7 Camera Sony A7R II Camera
Microphone Sennheiser MKE 400
GoPro Camera GoPro & Accessories
Sony 16-35 Lens Zeiss 16-35 F4
Travel Tripod Sirui Carbon Tripod
Ballhead RRS Compact Ballhead
Sony 70-200 Lens Sony 70-200 F4
Sony Flash Sony 43M Flash & LED
Camera Bag Domke F8 Camera Bag

Disclosure: Some of the links in this post are “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, I will receive an affiliate commission. Regardless, I only recommend products or services I use personally and believe will add value to my readers.

Comments & Questions

85 Comments

  1. David
    July 7, 2016

    Planning my backpacking, day by day. The Olympics in Brazil is definitely not one to miss.

    Reply
  2. Michael
    June 21, 2016

    Hi Matt, just curious if you had any thoughts on this daypack? Just came across it on Kickstarter and was thinking about ordering it because it seems pretty nice but just wanted your expert opinion since you have tested other daypacks. https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/travelmore/travelmore-jetpack-20l

    Reply
  3. stephen melinger
    June 20, 2016

    Putting a backpack on wheels and dragging it rather than holding it is advantageous. Balancing items on one’s head is not practical. Nor does it make sense to send items ahead and get them when arriving. Items that can be condensed to a smaller volume are welcome. For example clothes can be placed in plastic bags and the air can be removed by vacuums rendering it a smaller size.

    Reply
  4. stephen melinger
    June 20, 2016

    This brings to mind the broadcast from the 1960s of “I’ve Got a Secret” where a man traveled around the world using only a bike which carried all the things he couldn’t do without including a sleeping bag, tennis rackets and a radio. I wondered how he would handle a flat tire. He was prepared for any eventuality and entertained for money on the way. He was a gymnast and an acrobat.

    Reply
  5. daniel
    June 1, 2016

    Hi Matt,

    How do you deal with all this equipment? Isn’t It really difficult to hang around with 2 big backpack and one for the camera gear?
    How do you hike, or be comfortable in summer etc.
    Don’t you also have problem with laundry?

    I’ve backpacked 12 days in the baltic/scandinavia and honestly it was really difficult and I had only a big backpack, with clothes for 6 days (underpants and socks) and my camera gear, and was really trivial.

    Reply
  6. William Stephenson
    May 21, 2016

    Hey Matt, and everyone else. If you didn’t get your Arc’Teryx backpack, what bag would you go for now? I’m looking at the Fjellraven Friluft 35, but can’t decide exactly what backpack I’m after.

    Reply
  7. Brett
    May 17, 2016

    Hi Matt. I was just wondering, do you manage to fit your sleeping bag and hammock into the 38L pack?

    Reply
  8. Raven-Anne
    May 17, 2016

    Thank you for your blog and sharing these things with us. I turn 17 this October and I get my black belt right after i turn 18 next year, I really just want to travel immediately after I have my equipment ready. I have a part-time job at the moment. Any tips from this time until then? Anything would help immensely.

    Reply
  9. Brittany Thiessen
    May 13, 2016

    Thanks so much for sharing your travel gear guide! It was really helpful for me when I began planning my first solo trip.

    Reply
  10. Edward Smith
    May 8, 2016

    Excellent gear guide that helped me prepare for my own world travel adventure, many thanks!

    Reply
  11. JK
    May 5, 2016

    I noticed you had no cooking gear (ex: jetboil). What do you do for food?

    Reply
  12. Kat Spinks
    April 29, 2016

    Hey I was just wondering what you do to charge all of your devices while on the road or on a long hike. I know that many people who climb mount Everest have a solar panel they use and I was wondering what you think of that and where I could get one. Thanks!

    Reply
    • Matthew Karsten
      May 1, 2016

      Hi Kat! Yeah I’m actually going to pick up a Goal Zero solar panel system for an upcoming long-distance trek, but I don’t think it’s something you need for regular travel. I was able to hike for 10 days in Greenland with a backup battery for my phone (note taking, GPS, etc) along with careful power use.

      Reply
      • Patty
        May 7, 2016

        I actually used Goal Zero solar panel, it only works if you have an excellent sun source. I find it is just easier to pack extra backup battery and it should easily last more than 10 days, unless you are going in the wilderness over 10 days then Goal Zero solar panel is not necessary for most people.

        Reply
        • Caroline
          May 15, 2016

          Hey Patty, I use the LEVIN Solar Panel on my treks in the Himalayas. It’s very slim but also ultra-light… and it does not need a full bright sun to charge my devices (even if recommended). I now pack 1 light back up battery + my solar panel when on the trail, and even for city tours as the Solar Panel never runs out of energy :) – Thanks Matt for the great list!

    • Anne Alexandra Fortin
      June 14, 2016

      Hi, I have been using the 21W Anker Power port solar panel (2 usb plugs). I do a lot of multi-day trekking and absolutely love this solar panel. It charges really quickly.

      Reply
  13. Tenners
    January 30, 2015

    Hey Matthew. Your advice on travel gear is really great. I am trying to track down the Arc’teryx Arro day pack and can’t seem to find one anywhere (I also need it shipped to Australia). I don’t suppose you could point me in the right direction? Thanks for the great advice mate.

    Reply
  14. Alexis
    January 28, 2015

    Hi Matthew
    Great site. Loads of awesome information and input. My question is more of a tech question. I see you now run 3 x 2 tb drives. Are any of those redundant backups? Or do you utilise any online storage like Dropbox. My wife and I are starting our travels in December. And I’m the gadget geek in the marriage. So was just curious how you protect your photos and video footage. Maybe it would be better to just stock up on loads of USB sticks and SD cards. Thanks in advance. Keep up the great work.

    Reply
    • Matthew Karsten
      January 29, 2015

      Yup, one is an exact copy of the other with recent RAW photos & video files, the 3rd backs up my laptop hardrive along with older video that’s already backed up elsewhere (back in the US). I’ve started to shoot more video, and it eats a lot of space. I also use Backblaze, but that’s a slow process with video depending on internet speed.

      Reply
  15. Dana
    January 10, 2015

    Hi there! I’m so happy to have stumbled upon your site, what a great find! I’m about to head out for another year on the road and after looking at your equipment, I’m wondering what kind of electrical converter you use when traveling overseas? Thanks!

    Reply
    • Matthew Karsten
      January 13, 2015

      Hi Dana, I use an international power plug adapter I picked up at an airport, but not a voltage converter. Most electronics these days will run on either voltage (just read instructions to make sure).

      Reply
  16. Stephen Grayson
    January 5, 2015

    Hey Matthew,
    I see that you travel with multiple bags (e.g. Your primary bag, day bag, camera bag). I am curious to know how you manage to carry them all when you are travelling. I also am a photographer/videographer and want to bring some of my equipment. I just can’t imagine how I will be able to carry two + bags comfortably. Thank you.

    Reply
    • Matthew Karsten
      January 6, 2015

      Backpack on my back, daypack on my chest, and camera bag on my shoulder. Actual walking time with all 3 on is usually pretty minimal, just from a bus/train station or airport to where I’m staying. I have enough room to pack the camera stuff away into the other 2 when needed too.

      Reply
  17. Michael lloyd
    December 16, 2014

    Hi Mathew, I have found your blog very useful and informative. I am really keen on travelling the world but don’t know where to even start! Just wondering if you could possible help me?

    Reply
  18. Steve Walker
    December 4, 2014

    Thank for the informative post, nice job, keep up the good work. Question: which website would YOU go to find the most reliable, least expensive unlocked “world” phone? I’m embarking on a central/south America trip shortly and want to be able to make/receive calls from various countries. Or, is an Ipad mini good enough these days with wifi calls and skype? Thanks in advance for your answer.

    Reply
  19. David
    December 2, 2014

    Did you compare shotgun mics before choosing the Sennheiser MKE 400? What are your thoughts on the Sennheiser? I’m debating between the Sennheiser and the Rode Videomic, which is highly rated and considerably cheaper, but also significantly larger.

    Reply
    • Matthew Karsten
      December 3, 2014

      I too have heard the Rode has better sound, but I’m not a hardcore videographer so small size is more important to me.

      Reply
      • David
        December 3, 2014

        After I posted the original question, I asked a friend who is a photographer/videographer about his opinion of both. He claimed it is a toss-up, performance-wise. Given that they both perform comparably, I guess my final decision is based on whether the extra $71 for the Sennheiser is worth the extreme reduction in size.

        Reply
  20. Terry at TerryTreks
    November 20, 2014

    This is a great list that I refer to often. Thanks!

    Any changes since you wrote this article?

    Reply
    • Matthew Karsten
      November 26, 2014

      Glad to hear it Terry! Yeah, I update this page every year. My main backpack has shrunk from 65 liters to 38 liters, camera gear has changed, etc.

      Reply
      • Steve
        January 15, 2015

        I’m interested to know why you decided to expel from the 65litre backpack to bring it down to 38 as this is exactly the situation I’m in right now…

        Reply
        • Matthew Karsten
          January 15, 2015

          It’s just nice to carry less stuff, and after a few years I’ve learned to live with even less. You can always buy gear for specific adventures when needed, then give it away or sell it when you’re done.

  21. thomas
    October 22, 2014

    Hello,

    I’ve been looking everywhere for people who travel but ALSO do photography.

    I am researching to buy what I need for next year’s travels (my first time really) and I wasn’t sure what to pack or how to pack it.

    So, I’m guessing you carry your big backpack on your back, but what do you do about your smaller pack? Do you attach it to the big one somehow when you’re hiking through the forest or mountains to get a picture? Is your tripod attached to your small pack? I’m just trying to envision how this all works. Also, when you’re flying, does the big pack fit in overhead? Do you carry the big pack on your back and hold the smaller pack by hand?

    What goes in the smaller pack and what stays in the big pack?

    Reply
    • Matthew Karsten
      November 15, 2014

      Hi Thomas! I only carry both bags when traveling from place to place (bus, train, flights). Small one goes on my chest, and it contains my photography & computer equipment.

      For day hikes or exploring a town I use the small daypack loaded with camera gear, a rain jacket, water & snacks. When on a multi-day hiking/camping adventure, I use the larger pack, but store things I don’t need at a hostel or hotel. Like my laptop, extra clothes, etc. These places usually have a secure luggage closet or lockers for this.

      While I could travel carry-on only, I don’t. I like to pack a knife and don’t want to buy new toiletries after every flight, so I check the bigger bag. In 4 years of checking that bag, the airlines have lost it twice, and I got it back a day or two later. In my opinion checking a bag is no big deal.

      Reply
  22. Wendell Uren
    October 1, 2014

    Matt, Love the Blog and the packing list is really great. I was wondering what you use to shave? Also do you carry any type of simple first aid kit and what have you found is best to carry as far as medication?

    Reply
    • Matthew Karsten
      October 12, 2014

      Hi Wendell, I use a Gillette Mach 3 for shaving. You can buy cartridges almost anywhere. My first-aid kit includes simple bandages, Ibuprofen, Benadryl, and cold/flu tablets. I also carry dehydration tablets and daily multi-vitamins. My knee occasionally has issues on long and heavy-loaded hikes, so I pack a small knee brace.

      You can find most anything else at a local pharmacy when needed. You don’t need prescriptions for everything like you would in the States either.

      Reply
  23. Sean
    September 26, 2014

    Hi Matt, your blog is utterly awe inspiring! The key word there being ‘inspiring’. I have been reading for a while and have just come across this page and I was wondering how much of your equipment are you given by sponsors? If any?

    Reply
    • Matthew Karsten
      September 27, 2014

      Maybe 25%? I usually contact companies I want to work with, rather than them contacting me.

      Reply
      • Sean
        September 27, 2014

        Ahh, I see. Thanks Matt, keep up the good work :D

        Reply
  24. Jin
    September 23, 2014

    Matt – very inspiring blog! I came across it today and will be reading it more.

    When out on day trips in a new country photographing, do you typically take a smaller camera bag to carry just your camera, or do you lug your entire backpack around? Do you consider it safe to leave your belongings at your hotel/room, and have you had any issues with break-ins?

    Reply
    • Matthew Karsten
      October 12, 2014

      Hi Jin, I’m actually using a Domke F8 camera bag. When I go hiking or need more room for other things, I’ll just pack the camera in my daypack.

      I’ve never had problems with hotel breakins, and will lock up my expensive stuff in a locker when staying at hostels.

      Reply
  25. Cherub
    September 8, 2014

    Hey Matt! I love the website and more specifically the posts about your hitchhiking trip across the US. I plan on doing this as well and I keep reading to take as little as possible but with the laptop and DSLR involved I can’t get it to fit in just one bag. Did you take both your bags on that trip?

    Reply
    • Matthew Karsten
      September 12, 2014

      No just one bag, but my camera for that trip was a micro 4/3 with only 1 lens. So it packed very small.

      Reply
  26. Dan
    September 4, 2014

    All very great information, but I have a couple questions:

    1. Clothing: Do you wear a belt? (I’m leaning toward “if your pants fit, it’s entirely a matter of style”)

    2. Power: The power strip you list does not appear to be a surge protector. Is this a concern or do you simply refrain from charging your mobile devices during lightning storms? Also, you do not list an adapter set or power converter. Does this have to do with most of your travels being in Central America (as opposed to say, Europe)? Have you been able to manage without them?

    Thanks for your help!

    P.S. Just ordered hammock directly from Hennessy: $115 for the Scout (I’m small of stature) w/ snakeskins and shipping included. Very pleased.

    Reply
    • Matthew Karsten
      October 12, 2014

      I do like wearing a belt. It’s a cool one that also acts as an emergency harness (don’t remember the brand, but there are a few out there). The power strip does work as a surge protector too. I also pack a universal plug adapter, just one I bought at the airport in Hong Kong.

      Glad you like the Hennessy Dan! Such a wonderful way to camp.

      Reply
  27. Karsten W
    September 1, 2014

    Hey Matthew, just curious as to what you carry your laptop and laptop accessories in? Separate case/bag for it or do you just slip it into your day pack?
    I’ll be travelling Central America come November and would love to bring my laptop and gopro to update family and friends back home.

    Reply
    • Matthew Karsten
      September 2, 2014

      The laptop goes in a padded sleeve, accessories in a small Eagle Creek pack-it sac mentioned above. I keep both in my daypack when traveling, or a hostel locker/hotel safe.

      Reply
  28. Anand
    August 6, 2014

    Any updates on new gear/updated gear/clothing for your pack? Would love to hear about any new additions/replacements. Thanks!

    Reply
    • blackmamba
      August 11, 2014

      i would like to know which sleeping bag you usesome of the links are old and send you to non-existent pages

      Reply
      • Matthew Karsten
        August 20, 2014

        Sorry about that Mamba! It’s been fixed. In the past I used the REI Travel Sack.
        It’s cheap & lightweight — a warm weather bag. If I’m camping somewhere cold, I’ll pick up a cheap $15 bag locally, then combine the two.

        If you have a larger budget, I’d recommend my new favorite bag. Probably the lightest one you can buy right now.

        Reply
  29. Steve Burbidge
    July 17, 2014

    Planning to Hitch hike across USA, leaving about 18th September.

    Reply
  30. Peter Carroll
    July 13, 2014

    What would your suggestion be for colder climate, such as Europe in winter? Would your gear change? Or would you suggest just adding a jacket?

    Reply
    • Matthew Karsten
      July 17, 2014

      I usually just buy an extra sweatshirt or two, more socks, a knit hat, and maybe a decent sport-coat. Then I’ll give them away if I’m traveling somewhere warm again.

      Reply
  31. roger
    June 15, 2014

    I’ve never done any long-term travelling, but I was just wondering, does all the gear fit in the 50L backpack so you can use the day-pack only while visiting a city or do you also use it to store stuff while travelling?

    Reply
  32. Escape Hunter
    May 25, 2014

    A very interesting way to present your travel gear

    Reply
  33. David Ouellette
    May 13, 2014

    Hey Matt, you’re definitely one of my favorite travel bloggers right now, and I’m constantly on your page while starting my own blog. I’m packed for around 8 months in South America, and my camera gear is by far the heaviest (Canon 6D plus 4 lenses + tripod + lots of other accessories.) I noticed you were a photographer before. I guess having the gopro covers the ultrawide perspective, but do you ever feel limited by having one 24-70 lens? Also, you didn’t list a camera bag. Do you just stuff it in your day pack?
    Thanks!

    Reply
    • Matthew Karsten
      May 26, 2014

      Thanks David! I use a Domke F8 camera bag, but it can pack down into my other bags when needed.

      Sometimes the single lens can feel limiting, but not often. I think my photography has improved because I’m forced to work with only one lens. If I REALLY need that super wide shot, I can take multiple images and stitch them together in post. The Sony’s large full-frame sensor lets me zoom in quite close by cropping. It’s not the end of the world.

      I plan to invest in another soon. Not sure if it will be wide or telephoto yet. For big projects, I would rent an extra lens, and hopefully that will be an option soon with my new Sony A7. The reason I switched was the smaller size, so packing another lens or two won’t be as big a deal as it would have been with my old Canon 7D. Everything is smaller and lighter with mirrorless.

      Reply
      • Prasanna
        October 13, 2014

        Have you we ever had to worry about getting kidnapped or robbed while walking around with a DSLR in the less “touristy” locations?

        Preparing for my trip and this is one of my biggest concerns, any insight regarding this would be great!

        Reply
      • David
        November 17, 2014

        You may want to consider the Sony 16-35mm f/4 FE lens for your wide shots. It hits the market tomorrow. It’s the only other lens I plan to take with me other than the 24-70mm.

        Reply
    • Seth
      June 8, 2014

      Hey man, fellow traveler and photographer here ~ you don’t need 4 lenses. I traveled for 6 months with 2 lenses (a wide prime and versatile zoom), a joby gorillapod, and a single external flash unit.

      My full camera gear set up was:

      Nikon D300
      Nikon 28-80mm
      SB 600 external flash
      GorillaPod Tripod
      Wireless remote
      Neopreme DSLR Sleeve

      Stored the polarizer, flash, charger, and spare memory card in the flash’s compartment case in my backpack.
      Really didn’t need anything more than that. There was the occasion when I wanted a wider shot and would just get creative with my positioning or stitch photos.

      As for storing the camera – modern DSLRs are tough cookies. A neopreme sleeve was all the protection I needed. Plus, traveling with one lens meant it was protected along with the camera.

      Reply
  34. Collin Bryan
    May 13, 2014

    So I’ve gotta ask, do you walk around with the 50L on your back and the 25L on your front until you get to where you’re staying? Is that comfortable to walk around with? Are you comfortable leaving your bags anywhere specifically, or do you just always carry all your stuff with you.

    Also what about moisture with your electronics? I’m planning on the photo/laptop route as well and the biggest worries I have are impacts and moisture (from sweat or rain)

    :) by the way I just stumbled upon this blog and I’ve got to say it’s a good one.

    Reply
    • Matthew Karsten
      May 26, 2014

      Hi Collin, yeah I walk around with both of them until I check into accommodation. But really that doesn’t take too long, and rarely is uncomfortable. Then I’ll just put what I need for the day in my 25L daypack, if I need anything. The laptop, camera gear, passport gets locked in a locker or safe (one of the first things I look for in a hostel/hotel).

      There have been times when no locker is available, in which case I take a risk and leave it or bring some of the expensive stuff with me. It really depends on the circumstances.

      As for moisture, you can’t go wrong with a few Aloksak bags and silicon packets. I don’t bother with them unless the moisture/humidity is a big issue, which hasn’t been often.

      Reply
  35. Joel
    April 26, 2014

    Just wondering, how do you keep your cameras safe? I mean when your touring around and we all know that DSLRs are expensive and highly valuables and you’re wearing it around your neck exposing it to everyone.

    Reply
    • Matthew Karsten
      May 26, 2014

      The same way I’d keep it safe in the US. It’s a myth that other countries are somehow more dangerous. If you walk around the US with your camera around your neck, you can do it most places in the world. There are of course some areas in the US where I wouldn’t do this, which is the same elsewhere. There is no way to remove all risk (insuring your gear is the best option).

      If you are somewhere sketchy, locals will usually tell you to put it away. People look out for each other everywhere.

      Reply
  36. Joel
    April 16, 2014

    Hi Matt! Just wondering? How do you keep yourself, your backpacks and all you’re stuffs from sudden rain when you’re on the road or you’re in the middle of something? Thanks.

    Reply
    • Matthew Karsten
      April 16, 2014

      I keep a large black garden trash bag in my backpack. Just put it over the bag, poke some holes in for shoulder straps, and it works fine.

      For myself, I use the Arc’teryx rain/wind jacket mentioned above.

      Reply
  37. Kat
    April 10, 2014

    Hi Matt! Thanks for this. I’m planning on long term travel (hopefully) from next year and want to travel as light as possible. You’ve provided some terrific suggestions.

    Reply
    • Matthew Karsten
      April 13, 2014

      Happy to help Kat. I’m always searching for the lightest gear to make my home (aka backpack) as comfortable and functional as possible.

      Reply
  38. Chris
    April 8, 2014

    What camera do you use the intervalometer app on? The site did not show the A7 as being compatible.

    Reply
    • Matthew Karsten
      April 13, 2014

      It works with the A7. In the list of cameras there they call it the ILCE-7, which is really confusing, but that’s the A7.

      Reply
  39. Chris
    April 8, 2014

    No more Canon 7D? Do your bags weigh 40 each or total? What voltage adapter do you use? I am looking for a new one. Thanks.

    Reply
    • Matthew Karsten
      April 13, 2014

      Nope! I loved my 7D, but the Sony is more powerful and half the size/weight. A no-brainer when you make your living with travel photography. The bag weight is for both of them combined (about 30 lbs in the main pack, 10 lbs in the daypack). It actually might be a bit less now, haven’t weighed it all with my new camera setup.

      I don’t use a voltage adapter… but I do have a universal travel plug, if that’s what you mean. I’ve lost a few of them — but you can buy at any airport.

      Reply
  40. Jimmy Dau
    April 7, 2014

    Hi Matt. How are you finding the A7? I’m looking at going full frame for landscape but also doing more portrait/street photos

    Reply
    • Matthew Karsten
      April 8, 2014

      I love it Jimmy. Trying to prepare a full review about it in a few weeks actually. The perfect professional-quality travel camera.

      Reply
  41. Andy Conlin
    March 8, 2014

    Matthew! Glad to have re-found your blog. And this page, in particular. I’m a sucker for a good packing list :)
    What watch do you have? I don’t think it’s a HUGE deal, really, (“the one travel watch you MUST have” :P) as a simple watch will do the trick; I’m mostly just curious because our tastes and preferences in gear are very similar. Thanks!

    Reply
    • Matthew Karsten
      March 9, 2014

      I’ve actually ditched using a watch. I bought an expensive G-Shock at first, but it died while snorkeling (must have had a bad seal), then moved to a Casio Walmart special for $10. But these days I just use my phone. Haven’t missed it.

      Reply
  42. Travel Guides
    February 19, 2014

    Excellent and interesting..
    very well..thanks

    Reply
  43. Alex
    February 17, 2014

    Disregard my question haha. I actually looked at the hammock and I had my answer!

    Reply
    • Matthew Karsten
      February 22, 2014

      Yeah, love that hammock. Always have a comfortable place to sleep.

      Reply
  44. Alex
    February 17, 2014

    Hey great site! Quick comment/question…I noticed in your gear that you have no viable shelter option. You have the hammock, sleeping bag, jacket, etc. I am thinking about travelling to S. America soon, did you never need a small tarp/bivy sack/tent? Thanks for the info man!

    Reply
  45. Caitlin
    February 14, 2014

    Thanks for posting! I will be backpacking Peru to Rio in June and this is extremely helpful! Thanks for making such a great blog. Definitely my favorite out there!!!

    Reply
    • Matthew Karsten
      February 15, 2014

      No problem Caitlin, glad you found it useful. Have fun in South America!

      Reply

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